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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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DOCUMENTS 

RELATING TO 



THE CHARGES OF PROFESSOR 0. C. MARSH 



OP 



FRAUD AXD MISMANAGEMENT AT THE RED CLOUD AGENCY. 



[printed for the use of tiik investigating committee.] 



I. PROFESSOR MARSH'S CHARGES. 
II. GENERAL EATON'S LETTER. 

III. LETTER OF SECRETARY OF INTERIOR TO COMMISSIONERS TO INVESTIGATE 

AFFAIRS AT RED CLOUD AGENCY, WITH INCLOStJRES A AND B DATED 
JULY 27, 1S73. 

IV. LETTER OF SECRETARY OF INTERIOR TO COMMISSIONERS TO INVESTIGATE 

AFFAIRS AT RED CLOUD AGENCY, WITH INCLOSURES A B C D E AND F 
DATED AUGUST 2, 1875. 







hb^HHIH^^H^^^^^I^^^^^^I 





•" 






COAL ON WHITK MOUNTAIN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA. 






reservation by posting notices dated March 4, 1881, on the trails leading to the mines, 
on the works about the mines, and also had the notice read to passers. This did not 

deter the prospectors, and the work of development went on until , 188% when 

ttaev were removed by order of the Department of the Interior, by the military under 
General Crook. 



DEVELOPMENT. 

Four beds have been worked sufficiently to show their character. One shaft was 
sunk 200 feet another 100 feet. A tunnel was run 110 feet along the strike of the bed 
on which the 150-foot shaft was sunk, and a cross-cut of 40 feet made to a parallel bed. 
V number of shafts from 10 to 30 feet deep were opened on various beds. 

The. presence of water in the deeper shafts drove the miners out, and not having 
Dumping machinery the shafts were abandoned; as little care had been taken in tim- 
bering, the sides have largely fallen in. 

EXAMINATION OF THE COAL DEPOSITS. 

When tho Commission arrived at the coalfields they found that nothing had been 
done towards cleaning out the shafts, and that it was not possible to have it done owing 
to the caving in of the sides of the sbafrs, and the presence of a continuous flow of 
water. A tunnel, cutting through two of the principal coal-beds, had been partially 
cleaned out by Mr. James Little and his associated prospectors, and gave a very 
favorable examination. All other coal-beds were examined in prospect holes, and 
cuts made across the strike of the strata. 

The strike of the strata in which the coal-beds occur averages north 70° west (mag- 
netic); the dip of the coal-bearing bituminous shales and overlying and underlying 
sandstone is 05° at the surface, increasing to 80° 1(JU feet below ; the latter statement 
given by the miners. In the tunnel which cuts through two of the best beds thus far 
opened, the coal appears in the form of thin layers, interbedded with bituminous 
shale. 

The section'of the first bed cut by the tunnel gives— 

Ft. in. 

1. Black bituminous shaly coal, irregular, shining, but notof economic value . 3.00 

2. Clear bituminous coal 0. 10 

3. Bituminous shale with parting of coal similar to No. 2 4.02 



8.00 



The second bed is 40 feet beyond, 3* feet in thickness, with 10 inches of clear coal 
in one body. 

A shaft was sunk on the first bed, and the miners stated that the coal thickened up 
as they went down, but from the. fact that thny made no distinction between the bit- 
uminous shaly matter and the true coal, little reliance can be. placed on the statement 
as proving tho existence of a thicker bed of coal. The displacement of the beds dur- 
ing the uplifting of the strata, and the intrusion of the dikes of lava has plicated the 
coal-bearing shales in places and thus given a greater thickness in spots than the 
beds had originally. 

CHARACTER OF THE COAL. 

Analysis of coal from the 10-inch layers in the bed opened by the tunnel, as reported 
by Prof. F. AV. Clark, chief chemist of the United States Geological Survey: 
Analysis made by Mr. Edward Whitfield : 

Moisture 48 

Volatile combustible matter 19.81 

Combined carbon 61.01 

Ash (pink color) 18. 70 

100. 00 
Cooking properties poor. 

A sample from the 10-inch layer in the bed cut out by the cross-cut from the tunnel 
gave — 

Moisture 56 

Volatile combustible matter 17.50 

Combined carbon 60.85 

Ash (pink color) 21.09 

• 100. 00 

Cufoking properties fair. 

h 



«<- 



' , 






48th Congress, ) SENATE. . ( Ex. Doc 

) No " 



2d Session. f » No. 20. 



LETTER 



cU6' 



THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR, 



TRANSMITTING, 



In compliance with law, letter of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, with 
report upon the coal on the White Mountain Reservation in Arizona. 



JANUARY 6, 1885.— Referred to the Committee on Iudian Affairs and ordered to be 

printed. 



Department oe the Interior, 

Washington, December 26, 1884. 

Sir : I liare the honor to transmit herewith a copy of letter of the Cth 
instant from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, inclosing copy of the 
report of the Commission appointed under provisions of the act of July 
4, 18S4 (Pamph. Laws, LS83-'4, p. 95), to examine coal on the White 
Mountain Indian Reservation, in the Territory of Arizona. 

The law referred to requires that this report shall be transmitted to 
Congress. 

Verv respectfully, 

H. M. TELLER, 

Secretary. 
The President pro tempore of the Senate. 



Department of the Interior, 

Office of Indian Affairs, 

Washington, December 6, 1SS4. 
Sir : I have the bouor to acknowledge the receipt by your reference 
November 29, 1884, of the report, dated November 28, 1884, of the Com- 
mission appointed to examine and report upon the character, extent, 
&c, of the coal on the White Mountain Indian Reservation, in Arizona 
Territory, for examination and preparation for transmittal to Con- 

Bv'act of Congress approved July 4, 1884 (Stat., 23-95), the Secretary 
of the Interior was authorized to detail a proper person or persons from 
the emploves of the Geological Survey, and to also appoint a suitable 
person not then in the employ of the Government, " to examine and re- 
port upon the character, extent, thickness, and depth of each vein, the 
value of the coal per ton on the damp, and the best method to utilize 






the same, and to report their opinions as to the best method of dispos- 
ing thereof within the limits of the White Mountain Iudian Reservation, 



58th Congress. I 
3d Session. \ 



SENATE. 



.U«5 u_ 

\ DOCUMENT ^ff ("" 

"I No. 159. '^ 



U O. GttUju *j Sw<jq^^, <nil ftA V, A 



■9- 



OPENING OF THE UINTAH INDIAN RESERVATION IN 

UTAH. 



LETTER 

FROM 



THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR, 

TRANSMITTING 

A COPY OF A REPORT PROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN 
AFFAIRS CONTAINING A HISTORY OF THE ACTION TAKEN 3Y 
HIS OFFICE TO COMPLY WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE ACT 
OF MAY 27, 1902, FOR THE OPENING OF THE UINTAH INDIAN 
RESERVATION IN UTAH. 



February 15, 1905.- 



-Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to be 
printed. 



Department of the Interior, 

Washington, February 15, 1905. 
Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a resolution of 
the Senate dated February 4, 1905, in the following words: 

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, directed to report 
to the Senate, without delay, what steps have been taken to comply with the pro- 
visions of the act making appropriations for the current and contingent expenses of 
the Indian Department, and for fulfilling treaty stipulations with various Indian 
tribes for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and three, approved 
May twenty-seventh, nineteen hundred and two, which provides for the opening of 
the Uintah Reservation; and that he further furnish the Senate with all the causes 
which operated to stay the opening of said reservation, together with a copy of such 
order or orders made by him or by his direction, to carry out the said act of Congress 
in relation to the said reservation. 

In response I transmit herewith a copy of a report from the Com- 
missioner of Indian Affairs, dated the 11th instant, which contains a 
history of the action taken by his Office, under Department directions, 
to comply with the provisions of the act of May 27, 1902, for the 
opening of the Uintah Indian Reservation, in Utah; also a statement 
of the causes which operated to stay the opening of said reservation. 

Accompanying this report are copies of all correspondence of 
record in the Department up to date on the subject. 













£d Session. 



! 



I cJ 



59th Coxgress, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. (Document 



j No. 490. 



SALE OF CERTAIN TIMBER ON MENOMINEE INDIAN 
RESERVATION. WIS. 



LETTEE, 



FROM 



THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR, 

TRANSMITTING 

A COPY OF A COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSIONER, OF 
INDIAN AFFAIRS SUBMITTING RECOMMENDATIONS AS TO THE 
CUTTING OF CERTAIN TIMBER ON THE MENOMINEE INDIAN 
RESERVATION, IN WISCONSIN. . 



January 14, 1907.— Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to 

he printed. 



Department of the Interior, 
Washington, January 11, 1907. 

Sir : I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a letter from 
the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, dated the 8th instant, submit- 
ting certain correspondence in relation to legislation authorizing the 
cutting and disposal of dead and down timber on the Menominee 
Reservation, in the State of "Wisconsin. 

_ It appears from this correspondence that it is evident that the log- 
ging of dead and down timber can not profitably be done unde? 
the provisions of the act of Congress approved June 28, 1906 (34 
Stat. L., 547) , and that from the standpoints of forestry, economical 
logging, and the best interests of the Indians on the reservation it is 
advisable that the mature standing timber be cut and sold along with 
the dead and down timber. 

It is therefore respectfully recommended that the said act of June 
28, 1906, be repealed, and that the bill formerly prepared by the 
Indian Office and printed on page 3 of House Document No. 287, 
Fifty-ninth Congress, first session, be enacted in lieu thereof. 

In this connection, and for the information of the Congress, I 
transmit herewith the following: 

Copy of House Document No. 287, Fifty-ninth Congress, first session. 

Copy of a letter dated December 11, 1906, from J. R. Farr, general superin- 
tendent of logging. 

Copy of letter dated December 15, 1906, from the Commissioner of Indian 
Affair* 

Copy of letter dated December 31, 1900. from the Acting Secretary of Agri- 
culture. 

Very respectfully, E. A. Hitchcock, 

Secretary. 
The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 



60th Congress, { HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j Document "&■£ 
a M Session. \ No. 1072. 



6 



U.S. < ^|A,tx ^ ^w^Js^^ o^O^. . 



IMPROVEMENT OF THE WATER SYSTEM AT RAPID CITY 

INDIAN SCHOOL. 



LETTEB FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SUB- 
MITTING A REPORT AS TO IMPROVEMENT OF THE WATER 
SYSTEM AT RAPID CITY INDIAN SCHOOL. 



December 7, 1908.— Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to be 

printed. 



Department of The Interior, 

■ Office of Indian Affairs, 

Washington, December 3, 1908. 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Sir: In the act making appropriations for the current and contin- 
gent expenses of the department, etc., approved April 30, 1908 (35 
Stats., 70), appears this item: 

That the Commissioner of Indian Affairs is authorized and directed to invite pro- 
posals for the construction of a gravity water system for the Rapid City school to be 
supplied from the springs located on the school farms, said bids to cover construction 
of suitable reservoir and laying of a six-inch main thereon to said school buildings 
and grounds, and such minor and collateral piping as may seem necessary, and to 
report thereon to Congress. 

In accordance with these directions, I sent Robert M. Pringle, super- 
visor of engineering in the Indian service, to the Rapid City Indian 
school, and, after the necessary surveys had been made, had him pre- 
pare plans and specifications for the gravity water system referred to. 
Using these plans and specifications as a basis, I invited proposals from 
eight concerns which had previously bid on similar work in our 
service. 

The proposals received were as follows: 

W. D. Lovell, Minneapolis, Minn.: 

6-inch cast-iron pipe (as specified) $15,598 

8-inch cast-iron pipe (alternate) 19, 374 

6-inch steel Mathewson joint pipe 12,635 

8-inch steel Mathewson joint pipe 16,311 

6-inch standard fir wood pipe 10,384 

8-inch standard fir wood pipe 11, 624 

Symms-Powers Co., Sioux Falls, S. Dak.: 

For work complete (as specified) 17, 950 

Substituting 8-inch cast-iron main for 6-inch 21, 400 

Geo. Hinchliff Co., Security Building, Chicago, 111.: 

For work complete (as specified) 19,400 

Substituting 8-inch cast>ir<5n main for 6-inch 22, 880 




■J 



u. 



■<5. Qfcfr^ <r[. ^-~*Uo^ ^V-' 



U-l/4 



X-E33 



60th Congress, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j Document 
2d Session. f I No - 1(,7 l-„ 



IMPROVEMENT OF THE WATER SYSTEM AT RAPID CITY 

INDIAN SCHOOL. 



LETTER FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SUB- 
MITTING A REPORT AS TO IMPROVEMENT OF THE WATER 
SYSTEM AT RAPID CITY INDIAN SCHOOL. 



December 7, 1908.— Referred to the Committee on Indian Affaire and ordered to be 

printed. 



Department of The Interior, 

Office of Indian Affairs, 
Washington., December 3, 1908. 
The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Sir: In the act making appropriations for the current and contin- 
gent expenses of the department, etc., approved April 30, 1908(35 
Stats., 70), appears this item: 

That the Commissioner of Indian Affairs is authorized and directed to invite pro- 
posals for the construction of a gravity water system for the Rapid City school to be 
supplied from the springs located on the school farms, said bids to cover construction 
of suitable reservoir and laying of a six-inch main thereon to said school buildings 
and grounds, and such minor and collateral piping as may seem necessary, and to 
report thereon to Congress. 

In accordance with these directions, I sent Robert M. Pringle, super- 
visor of engineering in the Indian service, to the Rapid City Indian 
school, and" after the necessary surveys had been made, had him pre- 
pare plans and specifications for the gravity water system referred to. 
Using these plans and specifications as a basis, I invited proposals from 
eight concerns which had previously bid on similar work in our 
service. 

The proposals received were as follows: 

W. D. Lovell, Minneapolis, Minn.: 

6-inch cast-iron pipe (as specified) ■> »19, 698 

8-inch cast-iron pipe ( alternate) 19, 374 

6-inch steel Mathewson joint pipe 12, 635 

8-inch steel Mathewson joint pipe 16, 311 

6-inch standard fir wood pipe 1° >384 

8-inch standard fir wood pipe ... 11,624 

Symms-Powers Co., Sioux Falls, 8. Dak.: 

For work complete (as specified) 17, 950 

Substituting 8-inch cast-iron main for 6-inch 21, 400 

Geo. Hinchliff Co., Security Building, Chicago, 111.: 

For work complete (as specified) 19,400 

Substituting 8-inch cast-iron main for 6-inch 22, 880 










60th Congress, | HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j Document 
M Session. j \ No. 1071. 



IK/O- OiXi>ejL.. br| ti^^MA, aJ^o-'jyi. , 



DISPOSITION OB' CERTAIN NONRESERVAT10N INDIAN 

SCHOOLS.* 



LETTER FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SUB- 
MITTING A REPORT AS TO DISPOSITION OF CERTAIN NONRE8- 
ERVATION INDIAN SCHOOLS. 



Decembeb 7, 1908. 



-Referred to the Committee on Indian Affaire and ordered to be 
printed. ■» 



Department of the Interior, 

Office of Indian Affairs, 

Washington, December 4, 1908. 
The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Sir: I have the honor to report as follows, in accordance with that 
section of the Indian appropriation act for the fiscal year 1909 (35 
Stats., 70) which provides that — 

The Commissioner of Indian Affaire is hereby authorized, under the direction of 
the Secretary of the Interior, to ascertain whether and upon what terms it may be 
possible to dispose of any of the nonreservation Indian schools which, in his judg- 
ment, are no longer of value to the Indian service, and to report the result of his 
investigations to the next session of the Congress. 

After looking over the field of Indian education I was of opinion 
that the following Indian schools could readily be dispensed with 
without detriment to the general scheme: 

Grand Junction, Colo. 
Fort Lewis, Colo. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Chilocco, Okla. 
Chamberlain, S. Dak. 
Morris, Minn. 
Carson, Nev. 

Accordingly I addressed the executive of each State in which one 
of these schools is situated, describing the conditions and suggesting 
that, if the State could use this plant for educational purposes, or for 
a reformatory or school for wayward children, or for some other pub- 
lic use, such as an insane asylum, hospital, or sanitarium, I should be 
glad to discuss the possible terms for a transfer of the property from 
federal to state control. 
The result of my investigations may be summarized thus: 
Grand Junction and Fort Lewis, Colo. — Governor Buchtel answered 
that he was quite certain that the State could use one or both of these ' 
properties, as normal schools were very much needed in those districts, 






3 v^XAQxvv. OUkfrQAruy . •^ \| 

jOth Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. | Document jJ- 1 / 

1 No. 1071. 



«<# Session. 



DISPOSITION OF CERTAIN NONRESERVATION INDIAN 

SCHOOLS. 



LETTER FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SUB- 
MITTING A BEPORT AS TO DISPOSITION OF CEBTAIN NONRES- 
EBVATION INDIAN SCHOOLS. 



Decembeb 7, 1908.- 



-Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to be 
printed. 





Department of the Interior, 

Office of Indian Affairs, 
Washington, December J h 1908. 
The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Sir: I tave the honor to report as follows, in accordance with that 
section of the Indian appropriation act for the fiscal year 1909 (35 
Stats., 70) which provides that — 

The Commissioner of Indian Affairs is hereby authorized, under the direction of 
the Secretary of the Interior, to ascertain whether and upon what terms it may be 
possible to dispose of any of the nonreservation Indian schools which, in his judg- 
nient, are no longer of value to the Indian service, and to report the result of his 
investigations to the next session of the Congress. 

After looking over the field of Indian education I was of opinion 
that the following Indian schools could readilv be dispensed with 
without detriment to the general scheme: 

Grand Junction, Colo. 
Fort Lewis, Colo. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Chilocco, Okla. 
Chamberlain, 8. Dak. 
Morris, Minn. 
Carson, Nev. 

Accordingly I addressed the executive of each State in which one 
of these schools is situated, describing the conditions and suggesting 
that if the State could use this plant for educational purpos^efor for 
a reformatory or school for wayward children, or for some 4ifer pub- 
lic use, such as an insane asylum, hospital, or sanitarium. Fshould be 
glad to discuss the possible terms for a transfer of the property from 
federal to state control. 
The result of my investigations may be summarized thus: 
Grand Junction and Fort Lewis, Colo.— Governor Buchtel answered 
that he was quite certain that the State could use one or both of these 
properties, as normal schools were very much needed in those districts, 



. 



SUPPLIES FOE THE IXDIAX SERVICE. 

The following tables show the contracts awarded at Washington 
D C under advertisements of February 19, 25. and 26, March 5° and 
25, April 22 , July 1, and August 7. 1907. for supplies for the Indian 
Service, tor the fiscal year ending June 30. 190S: 



Clanifcatlon of rupplh t. 



Agricultural implements . 
Barley 



fate. 
208, 253 



Bacon, lard, and groceries 
Beef 



240 



Blankets and dry goods. . 

Boots and shoes ... 

Clothing and piece goods 

coai...: .....?..... 

Corn 



Enameled ware, lamps, etc. 
Feed 



Flour 

Furniture and wooden ware . . . 

Glass, oils, and paints 

Harness, leather, and findings. 
Hardware 



Hats and caps . . . 
Medical supplies 

Mutton 

Notions 

Oats 



Overalls, shirts, gloves, and suspenders 

salt : 



School books and supplies . . 

Stoves, pipe, etc 

Tin and stamped ware 

Underwear and hosiery 

Wagons and wagon fixtures . 



.. 23S, 247, 270 

- '240 

233 

201 

184 

271 

242 

202,248 

277 

27S 

203,249 

212,254 

250 
,258 
237 
187 
242 
236 
281 
235 
243 
196 
,257 



205 



218, 



217 



234 
210 



XrtiTHs and mtmhen of contractors. 



1. Adams. Henry, jr. 

2. Alexander & Co. 

3. Algerc Co.. C. H. 

4. Alleman, Charles L. 

5. Alton. George W. 

6. American Book Co. 

7. Anderson. John Q. 

8. ArbucHe. John. 

9. Aseptic Furniture Co. 

10. Babbitt Brothers. 

11. Baker, Wakefield. 

12. Ballin. Solomon. 

22849— A— 08 1 



13. Bate. Joseph M. 

14. Barker. Frank. 

15. Barnes, Edward. 

16. Barnhart. Kenneth. 

17. Battles. Charles E. 

18. Bauer. Gustav T. 

19. Beaven. John S. 

20. Becker-Moore Paint Co. 

21. Bell, Henry C. 

22. Bennion. Harden. 

23. Bergin. Edward E. 

24. Bernhard. Samuel T. 



181 




- 



SUPPLIES FOB THE DTDLL2S" SEEVICE. 




Service, for the fiscal year ending June 30. 1908: 



t'htwifieation of tv.pplies. 

Agricultural implements ogg 253 

Barley .'.'."."'."'. '. ".'".". " ' 240 

Bacon . lard . and groceries 238 247 276 

Beef ...... . ' ' : > 40 

Blankets and dry goods 233 

Boots and shoes". o ( ii 

Clothing and piece goods .'. J^4 

Coal...! ; .../^/-" '.'.'.'.'." '.'.'.*. 271 

Corn ^40 

Enameled ware, lamps, etc '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. -"'0 o 248 

Feed 277 

Flour 5-ig 

Furniture and wooden -ware " " " "~~ " " 'oqq ">49 

Glass, oils, and paints ]"""] .." 2X2 ^54 

Harness, leather, and findings oq^' 7->'- {) 

Hardware ".'"."".'."".'.['. 218:258 

Hats and caps 037 

.Medical supplies 137 

Mutton o 1 ■-} 

^°j ions .»'."-""";*;".:::;";::: 235 

Oats 2S1 

Overalls, shirts, gloves, ami suspenders ook 

sat ::::::::::::;:;:::;:: i« 

School hooks and supplies jgg 

Stoves, pipe, etc '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'217. 257 

Tin and stamped ware " 215^56 

Underwear and hosiery ' ' 934 

Wagons and wagon fixtures 210 

Kamis and numbers of contractors. 



1. Adams, Henry, jr. 

2. Alexander & Co. 

3. Algert Co.. C. H. 

4. Alleman, Charles L. 

5. Alton, George W. 

6. American Book Co. 

7. Anderson, John Q. 

8. Arbnckle, John. 

9. Aseptic Furniture Co. 

10. Babbitt Brothers. 

11. Baker, AYakefield. 

12. Ballin, Solomon. 



Balsz. Joseph M. 
Barker, Frank. 
Barnes, Edward. 
Barnhart, Kenneth. 
Battles. Charles E. 

18. Bauer. Gustav T. 

19. Beaven, John S. 
Becker-Moore Paint Co. 
Bell. Henry C. 
Bennion. Harden. 
Bergin. Edward E. 
Bernhard, Samuel T. 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 



2840- 



-08- 



181 






; ■ 



•■ 



SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



FISCAL YEAR 1911. 

The following tables show the contracts awarded at Washington, 
D. C, under advertisments of January 10 and 17, February 1, 10. 
and 14, March 7, April 1, May 2. July 25. and August 12, 1910, for 
supplies for the Indian Service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 191 1 : 

'. 'hjisincatior; of supplies . 

Pap;e 

Agricultural implements 112-113, 140-141 

Bacon, lard, and groceries 127-128 135-13S 

Barky .'.. { 2 S 

Beet 12S-130 

Blankets and dry goods 78 79 

g raI1 ----- •• .'.'".'.'.'."'.'.'. 162 

Boots and s oes S1-S2 

£° ai • ----- ;;i.'"."""""'i57-i58 

Corn meal, cracked wheat, etc 161 

g'T goods ..'.'.'.'".'.'..'. 78-79 

bnameled ware, lamps, etc 107-108, 136-137 

Feed, ground Igo 

£ ltmr ; , ....".!"!.""!"!"".'";*i58-i6i 

1- urmture and wooden ware 108-109 137-138 

Glass, oils, and paints \\ 117-119,' 141-143 

Gloves and suspenders go 

Groceries '.!""i27-128,' 135-136 

Hardware 93-106, 146-157 

Harness, leather, shoe findings, etc 109-112 13S-140 

Hats and caps ' gl 

Live stock 134 

Medical supplies 82-92 

Notions .'.'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 80-81 

^ ,- - - ; : 163-164 

Piece goods, clothing, etc 76-77 

S^- ----- ■ '......' i30-134 

School books, etc 121-127 

Shorts !!"!!.. 164 

Stoves, pipe, etc 120-121,' i-15-146 

Till and stamped ware 119-120, 143-145 

Underwear and hosiery 79 

Wagons and wagon fixtures, etc 113-116, 135 

Nanus and numbers of contractors . 

1. Abdalla, George. 12. Atlas Oil Co. 

2. Abraham & Straus. 13. Babbitt, David. 

3. Albrecht, Gustave A. 14. Bacon & Co. 

4. Alleman, Charles L. 15. Badger. William C. 

5. Alma Grain and Lumber Co. 16. Baker & Hamilton. 

6. American Book Co. 17. Baker, H. W., Linen Co. 

7. American Seating Co. 18. Banks, Frederic S. 

8. American Steel and Wire Co. 19. Barnes, Edward. 

9. Armour & Co. 20. Barnhart, Kenneth. 

10. Art Aseptible Furniture Co. 21. BartM, Leopold, & Son. 

11. Asceptic Products Co. 22. Bauer, Gustav T. 

64782—11 1 73 







1 



'. 






SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



FISCAL YEAR 1911. 



supplies for tte In<& S^e'fot'.he Aseal'^r £Z?J„£, R U , 

Classification of supplies. 

Agricultural implements.... „„ , Page 

Bacon, lard, and groceries 112-113, 140-141 

Barley 127-128, 135-138 

Beef 128 

Blankets and dry goods 128-130 

Bran ......'.'.' 78,79 

Boots and shoes " 162 

Coal 81-82 

Com meal, cracked wheat, etc - - 15 7-158 

Dry goods 161 

Enameled ware, lamps, etc ,*: 78-79 

Feed.ground ' 107-108,136-137 

Flour '_'_[ 162 

Furniture and wooden ware 158-161 

Glass, oils, and paints 108-109, 137-138 

Gloves and suspenders 117-119, 141-143 

Groceries 80 

Hardware ..] 127-128, 135-136 

Harness, leather, shoe findings," etc i iSHS J2H 67 

Hats and caps 109-112,138-140 

Live stock " 81 

Medical supplies ' 134 

Notions 82-92 

Oats '.'.'.'.'.'.[ 8 °- sl 

Piece goods, clothing, etc 163-164 

Salt 76-77 

School books, etc 130-134 

Shorts " '"" 121-127 

Stoves, pipe, etc... 164 

Tin and stamped ware 120-121, 145-146 

Underwear and hosiery 119-120,143-145 

Wagons and wagon fixtures,' etc..".'. >\"o\\» , 79 

lio-116, 135 

Names and numbers of contractors. 

1. Abdalla, George. io *,].,„ n; , ~„ 

2. Abraham & Sttaus. \f Babbitt n^H 

iitSMte. 1 - : I MC C 

I: flssssa--* ; : si «H- : o 

7. American Seating Co to £„£' v ^'■ L ^ en C °' 

tisssr 11 *"- ' 1zfl S " 

IO 4rt a ^+,ki„ i? ■. r. " JO - Barnhart, Kenneth. 

64782—11 1 

73 




j^BBB 



•- ' - 



l\.^ o : - *«. •?■ I' 



SUPPLIES FUR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



FISCAL YEAR 1912. 



The following tables show the contract* .awarded 

19 Oassifieation of sappUis. 

Agricultural implements '.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'... 

Bacon, lard, and groceries 

Barley, rolled 

Beef - -, 

Blankets and dry goods ----- 

Bran 

Boots and shoes •••*• 

Corn meal'," "cracked wheat, etc ]"[Y^IY^."""Y. 

Drv goods - ; 

Enameled ware, lamps, et< --- 

Feed, ground 

Flour _- 

Furniture and wooden ware 

Glass, oils, and paint 

gS^ d d^rtC^^'»5E;";:;;;::::::::: 
HwS«^r7s"ho;"undings;^::- ;;;;;;;::;::::;;: 

Hats and caps 

Hose goods "" 

Live stock " 

Medical supplies '" 

Mutton " " * 

Notions 

Oats : 

Piece goods, clothing, etc ■ 

School books, etc '.'.'.".".'.'.'."'.'.". 

Shorts ""_ 

Stoves,' pipe! hollow ware, etc '.'."'.'"•" 

Tin and stamped ware 

Underwear and hosiery - - ... -■■ 

Wagons and wagon fixtures, etc 



under advertise- 

August 21, 1911, 

ending June 30, 



Xames and numbers of contractors 



Page. 
29 

76 

77 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



icme Harvesting Machine Co. 
Albers Bros. Milling Co. 
Albrecht, Gustave A. 

ilumin°um a Goods Manufacturing Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Seating C o. 
Ard, William. 
Armour & Co. 

16148—12 1 



10. Art Aseptible Furniture Co. 

11. Aseptic Products Co. 

12. Aspaas, Hans. 

13. Atlas School Supply to. 

14. Babbitt, David. 

15. Badger Hudson Grain Co. 

16. Baker, Benton. 

17. Baker & Taylor Co., The. 

18. Barkhausen. Henry A. 



5 
87 
10 

-to 

80 
86 

5 

28 

87 

90 

60 

65 
8 

76 

10 

62 
9 

27 

85 

50 

79 

8 

89 

4 

80 
69 
88 
85 
38 
37 
7 
31 



> 



k 



u^. > 



-•. ' 




SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 

FISCAL YEAR 1912* 

191 " - Classification of supplies. 

\<mcultural implements ; " ; 

Bacon, lard, and groceries ;; 

Barley, rolled 

Beef -,-- V 

Blankets and dry good* '.'..... 

Bran 

Boots and shoes 

Coal '.".'.'.'.".'.'"'• 

com m; a i; cracked wheat,";te ;;;;;;;;::;::; 

Drv goods - ■ - " 

Enameled ware, lamps, etc 

Feed, ground ■ * * * " "* 

Furnitu'reand wooden ware 

Glass, oils, and paint 

Gloves and suspenders - - - - ■ ■ - - ■ - " " 

Groceries, dried fruits, canned goods, etc . . - - - ; ; 

KS'ie^^'shoeiindings;^:::::::. ........ 

Hats and caps 

Hose goods " 

Live stock 

Medical supplies " " , 

Mutton \ 

Notions "" 

Q a {g 

Piece goods, clothing, etc ....... 

Bait - \ 

School books, etc •" _ 

Shorts '.".*'.*. 

Stows,' pipe^ hollow ware, etc 

Tin and stamped ware 

Underwear and hosiery - - - 

Wagons and wagon fixtures, etc 



1 Acme Harvesting Machine C o. 

2 Albers Bros. Milling Co. 
3' \lbrecht, Gustave A. 

t. S^umGoods Manufacturing Co. 
6 American Book Co. 

7. \merican Seating to. 

8. Ard, William. 

9. Armour & Co. 

16148 



>A % OS* 



oY 



- \ v i S 



I 






APPLIES FOB THU INDIAN SERVICE- 

FISCAL YEAR 1813. 

The following tables *gr *&tff* d *S? "/Aft 

endin- June 30, 1913: 



Classification of supplies. 



Agricultural implements. 

Zon, lard, and groceries ■-• 

Barley, rolled " 

T3eef - 

Blankets and dry goods • - - - • ■ ■ • ; ; ; 

Bran. . .---• 

Boots and shoes 

Coal '.."..... 

Corn meal," cracked whea^ eic • - 

SSSfi*^."*^"*-" ::::::: 

Feed, ground ' " 

IS tare and woodenware 

Glass, oils, and paints ; 

l^lea-ther; 8 hoe fi ndings,etc...... 

Hats and caps 

Hose goods "" 

Live stock. - -, 

Medical supplies • • 

Mutton ' " 

Notions ' " ' 

Piece goods'/clothing', 'etc 

salt....-------:- ;;; 

School books, etc 

l^pipeVholi^reVet-c:::....- 

Tin a nd stamped ware - 

Underwear and ^siery- - - • — ; 

Wagons and wagon fixtures, etc.. 
Appendix 



Page. 
12 
29 
31 
32 
4 
86 
34 
74 
33 
85 
4 
10 
87 
91 
34 
40 
7 

29 
46 
37 
9 
62 
85 
63 
33 

89 
9 

30 
22 
88 
45 
43 
6 

14 

97 



1 Acme Harvesting Machine Co. 

6. American Biscuit Co., lhe. 

7. American Book co. 

(55989—13 1 



Names and numbers of contractors. 

• i 



12. Anderson, John y. 

It! in U septihle°FurniUue Co. 



*/? 



^•5,0^^ °\~£^, 



*vv -^ 



tt 



«i VI 



^f. 



SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



FISCAL YEAH 1913. 
contracts awarded imdt? adve^minV ? i UgUSt 12 ' 1912 >' aIso 



Classification of supplies 



Agricultural implements. . 

Bacon, lard, and groceries. . . " " 

Barley, rolled 

Beef ' " " " ; 

Blankets and dry goods 

Bran 

Boots and shoes. 

Coal 

Corn "" 

Corn meal, cracked wheat'etc 

Drygoods 

Enameled ware, lamps, etc 

r eed, ground -. 

Flour 

Furniture and woodenware 

Glass, oils, and paints 

Gloves and suspenders 

Ha°rS. d ^ d . fr . Uit8 ' ca ^dgoo"d"sVeto.-.V.::: 

Harness leather, shoe "findings " etc." 

Hatsandcaps 

Hose goods ;, 

Live stock " " 

Medical supplies. . . ...... 

Mutton 

Notions 

Oats '.'.'..'.'.'..'. 

Piece goods, clothing' eic 

Salt ; r~ 

School books, etc. ".". 

Shorts 

Stoves, pipe, hollow ware, etc. 

1 in and stamped ware 

Underwear and hosiery. 

Wagons and wagon fixtures'," etc." 

Appendix 



1. Acme Harvesting Machine Co. 

2. Albany Chemical Co. 

3. Albers Bros. Milling Co 

4. Albrecht, Gustave A. 

6. Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co 

6. American Biscuit Co., The 

7. American Book Co. 

65989—13 1 



Names and numbers of contractors. 



Page. 
12 
29 
31 
32 
4 
86 
34 
74 
33 
85 
4 
10 
87 
91 
34 
40 
7 
29 
46 
37 
9 
62 

85 

63 

33 
7 

89 
9 

30 

22 

88 

45 

43 
6 

14 

97 



8. American Carbolite Sales Co. 

9. American Commercial Corporation. 

10. American Seating Co 

11. American Steel Barrel Co. 

12. Anderson, John Q. 

13. Armour & Co. 

14. Art Aseptible Furniture Co. 









Bi 







5— 363C 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
#r"& OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



INDIAN MOTHERS. 

SAVE YOUE BABIES. 




Nurse Your Own Baby. 

Many Indian babies die before they are 2 years old because they 
do not have the right kind of care. 

44098°— 14 



\ 



' 




5— 363C 
DEPARTMENT OF. THE INTERIOR, 
% OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



INDIAN MOTHERS. 

SATE TOUR BABIES. 





Nurse Your Own Baby. 

Many Indian babies die before they are 2 years old because the 
do not have the right kind of care. 

4409S°— 14 



• 



> 



VARIOUS POSITIONS IN THE INDIAN 

SERVICE, TOGETHER WITH SALARIES 

PAID ON JULY 1, 1915 




Oc) 






" i 



/ 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1916 



l£- 



% 






*^ 



: 

i 



DESCRIPTION OF LANDS SUBJECT TO LEASE FOR MINING 
METALLIFEROUS METALS. 



i 



Department of the Interior, 

Washington, D. C, September £0, 1919. 

Section 26 of the Indian appropriation act of June 30, 1919 (Pub., 
No. 3), authorizes the location of mining claims by citizens of the 
United States on unallotted lands of Indian reservations, after such 
lands shall have been declared by the Secretary of the Interior to 
be subject to exploration for the discovery of gold, silver, copper, 
and other valuable metalliferous minerals. Should minerals be 
found locators have the privilege within one year of entering into a 
lease covering the land located. In accordance therewith I hereby 
declare the following described unallotted Indian lands subject to 
exploration on and after 12 o'clock m. on Saturday, November 1, 
1919, and, with the exception of such land therein as may contain 
springs, water holes, or other bodies of water, subject to location 
and lease: 

Arizona. 

moqui indian reservation. 



South. — Beginning at the Moqui south line (running east and west) the 
northernmost % of sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, in each of townships 24 north, 
in each of ranges 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, and part of range 22 ; being 
all that part of the Moqui Indian Reservation lying in said ranges and in 
townships 24 north (Navajo County). All of townships 25 north, in the same 
ranges (Navajo County). (These townships form the entire south belt of the 
reservation. Probably not all of the belt will be inviting to prospectors.) 

West.— Townships 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31 north, in ranges 13, 14, and 15, 
a broad belt along the Moqui west line, running from the south line to Blue 
Cayon ; half of range 15 being in Navajo County, but the remainder and ranges 
13 and 14 being in Coconino County. 

Northeast. — North and northeast of township 31 north, being the complete 
northeastern corner of the Moqui Reserve, which has not been surveyed, known 
locally as " the Black Mountain country," extending from Blue Cayon on the 
west to the Moqui east line, and from the strip of townships numbered 31 north 
to the north line of the Moqui Reserve. 

Salt River Indian Reservation. 

(Gila and Salt River meridian.) 



Sections. 



e. ion 

6 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 7; N. i of 8, 11, 12; W. i of the NW. J and the W. J of the E. J of the 

NW.iofl3 

All of 6 west of Salt River 

36 

31,32,33,34,35,36 

31, 32, and all of 33, 27, 28, and 29 lying within the Salt River Indian Reservation.. 




Range 
east. 



6- 

7 
5 
6- 
7 



139195°— 19 



/ 



e(9/<?J 



• 

U. S. Mice, d> 4*Mo* \ 



t}AA&. 



DESCRIPTION OF LANDS SUBJECT TO LEASE FOR MINING 
METALLIFEROUS METALS. 



Department of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C, September 20, 1919. 
Section 26 of the Indian appropriation act of June 30, 1919 (Pub., 
No. 3), authorizes the location of mining claims by citizens of the 
United States on unallotted lands of Indian reservations, after such 
lands shall have been declared by the Secretary of the Interior to 
be subject to exploration for the discovery of gold, silver, copper, 
and other valuable metalliferous minerals. Should minerals be 
found locators have the privilege within one year of entering into a 
lease covering the land located. In accordance therewith I hereby 
declare the following described unallotted Indian lands subject to 
exploration on and after 12 o'clock m. on Saturday, November 1, 
1919 and, with the exception of such land therein as may contain 
springs, water holes, or other bodies of water, subject to location 

and lease: 

Arizona. 



MOQUI INDIAN RESERVATION. 

South —Beginning at the Moqui south line (running east and west) the 
northernmost % of sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, in each of townships 24 north, 
in each of ranges 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, and part of range 22; being 
all that part of the Moqui Indian Reservation lying in said ranges and in 
townships 24 north (Navajo County). All of townships 25 north, in the same 
ranges (Navajo County). (These townships form the entire south belt of the 
reservation Probably not all of the belt will be inviting to prospectors.) 

\y est —Townships 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31 north, in ranges 13, 14, and 15, 
i broad belt along the Moqui west Jine, running from the south line to Blue 
Cayon; half of range 15 being in Navajo County, but the remainder and ranges 
13 and' 14 being in Coconino County. 

Northeast —North and northeast of township 31 north, being the complete 
northeastern corner of the Moqui Reserve, tvhich has not been surveyed, known 
locallv as " the Black Mountain country," extending from Blue Cayon on the 
west to the Moqui east line, and from the strip of townships numbered 31 north 
to the north line of the Moqui Reserve. 

Salt River Indian Reservation. 
(Gila and Salt River meridian.) 



Sections. 



Range 

east. 



6 5* i I', iAjl '■S.'i'ot's, li','l2;' W.'j'oi the NW.'i'and the' wToVt'he'E.Tof the 

Vw.johs 

All of 6 west ot Salt River '.'.'.'".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

3l', 32, Sdt'll 5 of 33', 27,28,'and 29 l'ytag'w'ithin' tne'SairRive'r'in'd'ian'Reservation. 
139195°— 19 




\ 



^ .Cj^«u of T4.^a <aMmU . 

REGULATIONS 



% 



GOVERNING 



THE EXECUTION OF LEASES OF 

INDIAN ALLOTTED AND 

TRIBAL LANDS 

FOR FARMING, GRAZING, AND 
BUSINESS PURPOSES 



APPROVED JULY 20, 1923 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1924 



u 



REGULATIONS 



' ^ r. 



GOVERNING 




THE EXECUTION OF LEASES OF 

INDIAN ALLOTTED AND 

TRIBAL LANDS 



FOR FARMING, GRAZING, AND 
BUSINESS PURPOSES 



APPROVED JULY 20, 1923 



■ 







WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1924 



§M 





REVISED 
REGULATIONS OF THE INDIAN Offl£E 











;WRKi 



■■■■■■■■■■ 




HHHHHHBBHI 







V-W 



■ 



WASHIN(^N> D. G 



» / 






UHH 



SLAV . I *«-■•::>:■« Siris-M 



■HBBHHB^^B^^^^^B^B^BHBBl 



•/ 



81642 

February 19,. 1934. 

» 

TM PUPOSE AJD 0P3RATI Q2T OF rs WHBEUSR-HQgABD INDIAN RIGflgS BILL 

IS. 2755; H. H. 7 c C 3) "~^ 

(A memorandum of explanation respectfully sub- 
mitted to the Members of the Senate and House 
Committees on Indian Affairs oy John Collier, 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs.) 



The Indian s are continuing to lose ground : yet govern- 
ment cort^ must increase, while the Indian s must still con- 
tinue tii lose ground, u nless existing law be changed . 

Two-thirds of the Indians, in two-thirds of the Indian country, for 
many years nave been drifting toward complete impoverishment. 

v Avei ^ ile ,^ in S Gripped of thoir property, these same Indians cumulatively 
have been disorganised as groups ana pushed to a lower social level as 
mai^iauals. 

14* ? arl ? g th 5 5 time ' When Indian wealth has been shrinking and Indian 
liie has been diminishing, the costs of Indian administration in the 

IT* a V reaS ^'^ boen increasin S' ^e Complications of bureaucratic 
management nave grown steadily greater. 

in^rS 1 ? f "v th6 . Indians - ^d' still larger costs to the Government, are \ 
insured by the existing system. 

ITeither the Indians themselves, nor the Indian Service, can reverse 

:^,Tf : r ° C ^' ° r eVCn matpriall y ielay it, unless certain funda- 
mental impracticabilities of law can be changed. 

TT ^ + J^ f d j Gastr ° U3 co ^ition, peculiar to the Indian situation in the 
united States, ana sharply in contrast with the Indian situations both 
of Canar.a ana oi Mexico, is directly and inevitably the result ef cxist- 

ig irj,. priucips ...y in* no exclusively, the allotment law and its 
amendments ana up c^uimstrative complications* 

tho J*« "Sproxtettoly one-third of the Indians who as yet are outside 
the allotment syr.z^ are net losing their property; and generally thev a r r 

m >p -;,Z„ n J t J" ^ ■ rir -in«. not i-'.llmg, m the social scale. 

:rL° inaian Rcai) ^stration are markedly lower in these unallotted 

nevertheless, these unallotted Indians are handicapped by certain 

!!f^V '-'^ '^ WMCh ^ e to^eaEPinS a ^ Indians, unallotted 
and allottea aiihe. ■